My favourite folk-inspired Soulsinger: Ladies and Gentlemen, Mr. #TerryCallier ! #nowplaying #vinyl

My favourite folk-inspired Soulsinger: Ladies and Gentlemen, Mr. #TerryCallier ! #nowplaying #vinyl

Words of wisdom.

Words of wisdom.

Thanks to L. for being such a great person and a dear friend!

Thanks to L. for being such a great person and a dear friend!

Die Morgenlandfahrt, Suhrkamp 1965 #Hermann_Hesse #literature

Die Morgenlandfahrt, Suhrkamp 1965 #Hermann_Hesse #literature

Finer things in life: Art and Hiphop

::: Inspired by this project, I decided to do my own version. Forgive my total lack in photoshop skills, I actually used Preview. I also tried to use more obscure songs, but went rather mainstream with the paintings.:::

Here’s the list:

Max Beckmann : Selfportrait in a tuxedo (1927) vs. Digable Planets: Rebirth of Slick (Cool like dat) (1993)

Katsushika Hokusai: A courtesan standing (Edo period) vs. Jaylib: Starz (2003)

Edvard Munch: The scream (1893) vs. Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five: The Message (1982)

Peter Paul Rubens Venus in Front of the Mirror, 1614/1615 vs. A Tribe called Quest: Bonita Applebum (1990)

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio: The Young Sick Bacchus (1593/94) vs. Kanye West: I am a god (2013)

John Everett Millais : Ophelia (1851-52) vs. Neneh Cherry: I ain’t gone under yet (1992)

Tizian: Sisyphos (1549) vs. Eric B. and Rakim: Paid in Full (1987)

Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres Napoleon I on his Imperial Throne (1806) vs. N.E.R.D. : Rockstar (2001)

Johannes Vermeer: Girl with a Pearl Earring (ca. 1665) vs. The Streets: Fit but you know it (2004)

Ibeyi : Oya (Xl Recordings, 2014)

::: What a debut! The nineteen year old twins Naomi and Lisa-Kainde Diaz teamed up with XL Recordings’ president Richard Russel to produce their first album, due to be released later this year. The twins are french-cuban with a yorubian background and come from a musical family. Oya reminds me of Bjork’s Joga, which sure as hell is a good thing, and I look forward to more songs from them :::

Leo Tolstoy: Anna Karenina (1873-1878)
(cover of the first edition, via wikipedia)

:::Now reading this one- it will take a while. Plan to publish quotes and thoughts via twitter.:::

Leo Tolstoy: Anna Karenina (1873-1878)
(cover of the first edition, via wikipedia)

:::Now reading this one- it will take a while. Plan to publish quotes and thoughts via twitter.:::

Damn, I heart fruit.
#strawberries #raspberries #blueberries #30º #baden-wuerttemberg

Damn, I heart fruit.
#strawberries #raspberries #blueberries #30º #baden-wuerttemberg

Gil Scott-Heron Tribute Mix by Gilles Peterson

:::I’m not the only one who misses him. Tribute to Gil Scott Heron by british music icon Gilles Peterson.:::

My Own Private Tokyo

William Gibson on post-bubble Japan. Great Read!

maluruhukou:

by William Gibson, Wired, Sep 2001

I wish I had a thousand-yen note for every journalist who, over the past decade, has asked me whether Japan is still as futurologically sexy as it seemed to be in the ’80s. If I did, I’d take one of these spotlessly lace-upholstered taxis over to the Ginza and buy my wife a small box of the most expensive Belgian chocolates in the universe.

I’m back to Tokyo tonight to refresh my sense of place, check out the post-Bubble city, professionally resharpen that handy Japanese edge. If you believe, as I do, that all cultural change is essentially technology-driven, you pay attention to Japan. There are reasons for that, and they run deep.

Dining late, in a plastic-draped gypsy noodle stall in Shinjuku, the classic cliché better-than-Blade Runner Tokyo street set, I scope my neighbor’s phone as he checks his text messages. Wafer-thin, Kandy Kolor pearlescent white, complexly curvilinear, totally ephemeral looking, its screen seethes with a miniature version of Shinjuku’s neon light show. He’s got the rosary-like anticancer charm attached; most people here do, believing it deflects microwaves, grounding them away from the brain. It looks great, in terms of a novelist’s need for props, but it may not actually be that next-generation in terms of what I’m used to back home.

Tokyo has been my handiest prop shop for as long as I’ve been writing: sheer eye candy. You can see more chronological strata of futuristic design in a Tokyo streetscape than anywhere else in the world. Like successive layers of Tomorrowlands, older ones showing through when the newer ones start to peel.

The world’s second-richest economy, after a decade of stagflation, still looks like the world’s richest place, but the global lea lines of money and hustle have invisibly realigned. It feels to me as though all that crazy momentum has finally arrived.

So the pearlescent phone with the cancer thingy gets drafted straight into props, but what about Japan itself? The Bubble’s gone, successive economic plans sputter and wobble to the same halt, one political scandal follows another … Is that the future?

Yes. Part of it, and not necessarily ours, but definitely yes. The Japanese love “futuristic” things precisely because they’ve been living in the future for such a very long time now. History, that other form of speculative fiction, explains why.

The Japanese, you see, have been repeatedly drop-kicked, ever further down the timeline, by serial national traumata of quite unthinkable weirdness, by 150 years of deep, almost constant, change. The 20th century, for Japan, was like a ride on a rocket sled, with successive bundles of fuel igniting spontaneously, one after another.

They have had one strange ride, the Japanese, and we tend to forget that.

In 1854, with Commodore Perry’s second landing, gunboat diplomacy ended 200 years of self-imposed isolation, a deliberate stretching out of the feudal dreamtime. The Japanese knew that America, not to be denied, had come knocking with the future in its hip pocket. This was the quintessential cargo-cult moment for Japan: the arrival of alien tech.

The people who ran Japan - the emperor, the lords and ladies of his court, the nobles, and the very wealthy - were entranced. It must have seemed as though these visitors emerged from some rip in the fabric of reality. Imagine the Roswell Incident as a trade mission, a successful one; imagine us buying all the Gray technology we could afford, no reverse engineering required. This was a cargo cult where the cargo actually did what it claimed to do.

They must all have gone briefly but thoroughly mad, then pulled it together somehow and plunged on. The Industrial Revolution came whole, in kit form: steamships, railroads, telegraphy, factories, Western medicine, the division of labor - not to mention a mechanized military and the political will to use it. Then those Americans returned to whack Asia’s first industrial society with the light of a thousand suns - twice, and very hard - and thus the War ended.

At which point the aliens arrived in force, this time with briefcases and plans, bent on a cultural retrofit from the scorched earth up. Certain central aspects of the feudal-industrial core were left intact, while other areas of the nation’s political and business culture were heavily grafted with American tissue, resulting in hybrid forms …

Read More

(Quelle: youmightfindyourself)

Reblogged from maluruhukou with 186 Anmerkungen

Syl Johnson : Is It Because I’m Black (1969)

:::The dark brown shades of my skin, only add colour to my tears
That splash against my hollow bones, that rocks my soul
Looking back over my false dreams, that I once knew
Wondering why my dreams never came true

Is it because I’m black?
Somebody tell me, what can I do
Something is holding me back
Is it because I’m black?
In this world of no pity
I was raised in the ghetto of the city
Momma, she works so hard
To earn every penny
Something is holding me back
Is it because I’m black?

Like a child stealing candy for the first time, and got caught
Thiefing around life’s corner somewhere I got lost
Something is holding me back
I wonder, is it because I’m black?
Somebody tell me what can I do
Will I survive, or will I die?

You keep on holding me back
You keep on holding on
You keep on picking on me
You keep on holding me back
You keep on holding on
You keep on holding on
You’re holding me back
I wonder why, you do me like that
But you keep on holding me back
You keep on putting your foot on me
But I, I’ve got to break away
Somehow and someday
Cause I wanna be somebody so bad, so bad
I wanna be somebody, I wanna be somebody so bad
You see, I want diamond rings and things, like you do
And I wanna drive Cadillac cars
I wanna be somebody so bad
But you keep on putting your foot on me
And I, I believe, I believe I can break away
And be somebody, somehow, and someway

Ya see, I heard somebody say one time
You can make it, if you try
And some of us, we tried so hard, we tried so hard
I want you to know that I don’t speak for myself
But I speak for y’all too right now
Ya see, if you have white-like brown skin and a high yeller
You’re still black
So we all got to stick together right now
This I wanna say to you my sisters and my brothers
Right on sister
Right on brother

Dig this:
And we keep on pushing down
We’ve got to make it a little bit further
We’ve got to make it a little further
All we got to do is try, try, try
And some of us, we’ve tried so hard
We’ve tried so hard, we’ve tried so hard
We’ve tried so hard, so hard to be somebody
We’ve tried so hard, although, they’re holding us back
And it stairs the reason, that they’re doing us like that
You know what? It is
I believe, it is because we are black
But hey, we can’t stop now, we can’t stop now
We’ve got to keep on, keep on, keep on, keeping on
We’ve got to keep on keeping on
I know and I know and I know that you know that I know it ain’t right
Oh, it ain’t right, it ain’t right, it ain’t right
That they hold us, hold us, hold us back
They’re holding us back, they’re holding us back
I wonder, sometimes I sit down, sit down and I wonder:::

He certainly looks happy. Jade-Figurine from Thailand. #buddha

He certainly looks happy. Jade-Figurine from Thailand. #buddha

Impressions of grandma’s garden

1. an awesome-smelling peony. Funny thing: the different-colored peonies don’t smell at all!
2. red leaf beet
3. strawberries (not ripe yet)
4. common marigold
5. a single asparagus. obviously it’s the bravest of the bunch.
6. peaches (they’ll need a few more weeks, possibly until mid-july)
7. beans!
8. potatoes.lots of them.

::: My grandmother has a few dozen square-meters of vegetables and fruit in her garden. That honestly generates food for months- alas, it also needs to be tended to all the time.:::

#streetart

#streetart

Jamie Byng in conversation with Gil Scott-Heron

::: Jamie Byng ist der Herausgeber von Canongate Books; dem Verlag, der GSHs Autobiografie “The Last Holiday” herausbrachte- und ein Freund Herons über 20 Jahre. Ein intimes Gespräch mit Musikausschnitten. :::

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